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Leopold - Urinoir, 1992

And delightful, and wickedly subversive.

In fact, you would be extremely hard pressed to find a more overtly celebratory sexual public event relishing queerdom by a mainstream gallery this side of the Atlantic.

This is not your mother’s ceramics.

Camp Fires focuses on three exceptional Canadian artists, Léopold L. Foulem,
Paul Mathieu and Richard Milette, who work with clay and are known internationally.

“Their work is provocative,” says Kelvin Browne, Executive Director & CEO of the Gardiner Museum, and “has remarkable insight about gender issues and Queer Identity in particular.”

“I personally think there’s humour in this exhibition too,” says Browne, “and that’s refreshing.”

That along with their playful skewering of daily household items, religious iconography, and Santa. High camp. All in good fun. Decidedly un-PC. Refreshing indeed.

“Léopold L. Foulem, Paul Mathieu and Richard Milette are among Canada’s most important contemporary ceramists on the international stage,” says Robin Metcalfe, Curator of Camp Fires and Director/Curator of Saint Mary’s University Art Gallery. “They are notable for their wit, a deep understanding of ceramics history, a willingness to engage with the theatricality and excess of Baroque visual aesthetics, and a frank and ribald engagement with the sexual body.”

All this on the heels of last year’s equally disruptive “Transformation by Fire,” The Gardiner has [out] done themselves proud.

Camp Fires: The Queer Baroque of Léopold L. Foulem, Paul Mathieu and Richard Milette
at the Gardiner Museum through September 1.

Pictured above: Finally, my trophy. Léopold L. Foulem – Urinoir, 1992.

2 thoughts on ““Clay is so gay.”

  1. Pingback: Flamboyant | Kirbs

  2. Pingback: Camp out | Kirbs

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